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WILLIAM D. KELLY HANDWRITTEN LETTER SIGNED TO U.S. GRANT, BLACK TROOPS, CIVIL RIGHTS, JUDGE

$110.00

Description

HANDWRITTEN LETTER TO PRESIDENT U.S. GRANT FROM ONE OF THE FOUNDERS OF THE REPUBLICAN PARTY AND AN ABOLITIONIST FRIEND OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN, WHO ADVOCATED THE ENLISTMENT OF BLACK TROOPS IN THE CIVIL WAR AND THE EXTENDING OF THE VOTE TO THEM AFTERWARDS, HERE OFFERS A RECOMMENDATION FOR A CIRCUIT JUDGESHIP IN PENNSYLVANIA

William Darrah Kelley (1814 – 1890) Handwritten Letter Signed, "Yours very truly, Wm. D. Kelly", 8 x 10, on lined paper, Washington, Nov 29th, 1869, making a recommendation to U. S. Grant for a judgeship appointment for the Hon. Joseph Allison, In Part: "To the President, Dear Sir, My constituents feel...in the selection soon to be made of a Circuit Judge for our circuit. I have taken pains to ascertain their wishes and believe that comply with the desire...His...career as Judge extending through a period of eighteen years has secured him the confidence and esteem of the bar and people at large...I believe that his appointment would give more general satisfaction than that of any other gentleman...most earnestly that you may fine it agreeable to appoint him....", by the Republican member of the U. S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. As an abolitionist, he was one of the founders of the Republican Party in 1854, and a friend of Abraham Lincoln. Kelley was a man of strict principles, advocating the recruitment of black troops in the civil war, and the extending of the vote to them afterwards. In his later career, Kelley was best known as an advocate of a high protective tariff: His support for high duties on two Pennsylvania products, iron and steel, earned him the nickname, "Pig-Iron" Kelley. His belief was sincere, and so strong that he would never let himself wear any garment made from an imported product or use any article made in a foreign country. He became involved in politics as an antislavery member of the Democratic Party, and in 1846 Governor Francis R. Shunk appointed Kelley a Judge of the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas, where he served until 1856. After the repeal of the Missouri Compromise by the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, Kelley quit the Democratic Party and was one of the founders of the Republican Party. Kelley was elected as a Republican to Congress in 1860 and served from March 4, 1861, until his death in Washington, D.C. In fine condition.

Hon. Joseph Allison (1819-96) became President Judge of the Common Pleas Court No.l and served until his death.

$110   #12239