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GENERAL DANIEL ULLMANN TWICE SIGNED DOCUMENT CIVIL WAR COLORED TROOPS

$395.00

Description

ON OCTOBER 10TH 1862 HE MET WITH PRESIDENT ABRAHAM LINCOLN TO DISCUSS LIBERATING AND ARMING FREEDMEN: HIS DISCUSSIONS WITH PRESIDENT LINCOLN EARNED HIM A PROMOTION TO BRIGADIER GENERAL AND LESS THAN TWO WEEKS AFTER LINCOLN SIGNED THE EMANCIPATION PROCLAMATION HE WAS SENT TO NEW ORLEANS TO ENLIST AFRICAN AMERICANS AS SOLDIERS IN CORP'S D'AFRIQUE, THE FIRST BLACK TROOPS ORDERED RAISED BY THE UNION

General Daniel Ullmann (1810 –1892) Document Signed Twice, "Daniel Ullmann, B. G. C.", 7.5 x 9.75, September 8, 1863, payment for the rent and fuel (cords of wood) for his private house in New Orleans (no military quarters were available), by an American lawyer and politician from New York who served as a Union Army general in the American Civil War. Captured at the Battle of Cedar Mountain in August 1862, he was detained at Libby Prison until he was paroled two months later. He later approached President Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of enlisting African Americans as soldiers. After subsequent discussion, on January 13,1863, just 12 days after President Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, Ullmann was promoted to brigadier general and sent to New Orleans, Louisiana where he raised five regiments of African Americans as soldiers in a unit that was designated the Corps d'Afrique. He now commanded a brigade made up of those colored infantry regiments and a regiment of colored engineers. Ullmann led his men into the Siege of Port Hudson, where they suffered heavy casualties. The Siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana (May 22 – July 9, 1863), was the final engagement in the Union campaign to recapture the Mississippi River in the American Civil War. After the war he was a vigorous advocate of civil rights for black Americans. This rare twice-signed Civil War-date document is in fine condition, with age toning and two .

The United States Colored Troops (USCT) were regiments in the United States Army composed primarily of African-American (colored) soldiers, although members of other minority groups also served with the units. They were first recruited during the American Civil War, and by the end of that war in April 1865, the 175 USCT regiments constituted about one-tenth of the manpower of the Union Army. About 20% of USCT soldiers died, a rate about 35% higher than that for white Union troops. Despite heavy casualties, many fought with distinction, 15 USCT soldiers receiving the Medal of Honor and numerous others receiving other honors. The USCT regiments were precursors to the Buffalo Soldier regiments in the American Old West

$395   #11612ZUL