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CHARLES A. LINDBERGH ORIGINAL AIR MAIL ENVELOPE FLOWN BY HIM ON THE SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS, ON HIS FAMOUS SOUTH AMERICAN TOUR IN 1927, POSTMARKED IN MEXICO WHERE HE MET HIS FUTURE WIFE ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH

$295.00

Description

 CHARLES A. LINDBERGH AIR MAIL COVER, 9.5 X 4, FLOWN BY HIM, DECEMBER 1927, ON THE SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS, ON THE FIRST STOP OF HIS FAMOUS SOUTH AMERICAN TOUR, IN MEXICO, WHERE HE MET HIS FUTURE WIFE ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH

(A small circular image of the aviator appears at top margin above caption “our hero”. On the reverse are several official stamps and postmarks, the Mexican one has been hand-signed by a postal official attesting to the time and date of Lindbergh’s arrival. Light general toning; minor soiling and wear; else fine.)

 Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974), nicknamed Lucky Lindy, and The Lone Eagle, was an American aviator, military officer, author, inventor, explorer, and environmental activist. At age 25 in 1927, he went from obscurity as a U.S. Air Mail pilot to instantaneous world fame by winning the Orteig Prize–making a nonstop flight from Long Island, New York, to Paris. He covered the 33 12-hour, 3,600 statute miles (5,800 km) alone in a single-engine purpose-built Ryan monoplane, Spirit of St. Louis. This was the first solo transatlantic flight and the first non-stop flight between North America and mainland Europe. Lindbergh was an officer in the U.S Army Air Corps Reserve, and he received the United States' highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for the feat. He also won the Pulitzer Prize for his autobiography, The Spirit of St. Louis (1953). 

Lindbergh then toured 16 Latin America countries between December 13, 1927 and February 8, 1928. Dubbed the "Good Will Tour", it included stops in Mexico (where he also met his future wife, Anne, the daughter of U.S. Ambassador Dwight Morrow), Guatemala, British Honduras, Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Panama, the Canal Zone, Colombia, Venezuela, St. Thomas, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Cuba, covering 9,390 miles (15,110 km) in just over 116 hours of flight time. A year and two days after it had made its first flight, Lindbergh flew the Spirit from St. Louis to Washington, D.C., where it has been on public display at the Smithsonian Institution ever since. Over the previous 367 days, Lindbergh and the Spirit had logged 489 hours 28 minutes of flight time together.

 $295   #10691