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ANGUS CAMERON LETTER SIGNED, COMPROMISE OF 1877, CIVIL RIGHTS, CIVIL WAR

$395.00

Description

 A U.S. SENATOR INVOLVED IN INVESTIGATING ELECTION FRAUD IN ONE OF THE MOST CONTENTIOUS AND CONTROVERSIAL PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS IN AMERICAN HISTORY THAT LED TO THE DISENFRANCHISEMENT OF BLACK VOTERS IN THE SOUTH, HERE OFFERS THE U.S. ATTORNEY GENERAL, WHO WAS ALSO A THREE-TIME WOUNDED AMERICAN CIVIL WAR GENERAL, A RECOMMENDATION FOR A POSITION AS U.S. MARSHALL OF THE DAKOTA TERRITORY, TO A FORMER CIVIL WAR OFFICER AND THE CURRENT PUBLISHER OF THE LEADING REPUBLICAN PAPER, WHO HE MET WHILE INVESTIGATING ELECTION FRAUD IN THE 1876 PRESIDENTAL ELECTION

Angus Cameron (1826 – 1897) Handwritten Letter Signed to U.S. Attorney General Charles Devens, "Very Respectfully Your Obt. Servant - Angus Cameron", 2 pgs., 8 x 10.5, on "Law Office of Cameron, Losey & Bunn" letterhead, La Crosse, Wis., May 25th, 1877, by the American lawyer, banker, and politician who served ten years (1875-85) as United States Senator from Wisconsin. During this term he was appointed chairman of a committee to investigate alleged election fraud in South Carolina during the disputed United States presidential election of 1876. In part: "Hon. Charles Devens, Attorney General...Mr. John B. Raymond of Mississippi is a candidate for the office of Marshal of Dakota - Mr. Raymond entered the Federal Army...served with credit until the war closed and then settled in Mississippi...and publishes the leading Republican paper in that state...is in every respect qualified to discharge the duties of the office he seeks. I met Mr. Raymond at Jackson, Mississippi...as a member of a Senate Committee in June 1876 [this is when he was investigating election fraud during the contentious presidential election of 1876]...Mr. Raymond's appointment would be very gratifying to the Mississippi Republicans...." Records show that he received the appointment.

Charles Devens Jr. (1820 – 1891) was an American lawyer, jurist and statesman. He also served as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was wounded at the Battle of Ball's Bluff in Virginia in October. Although still recovering, Devens was promoted to brigadier general of volunteers in April 1862 and assigned command of the 1st Brigade/1st Division. He was wounded a second time at the Battle of Seven Pines and spent most of the summer recovering. In January 1863, Devens was appointed as a division commander, and at Chancellorsville he was wounded a third time. Devens troops were the first to occupy Richmond after its fall in April 1865. He was a judge of the Massachusetts superior court, from 1867 to 1873, and was an associate justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Court from 1873 to 1877, and again from 1881 to 1891. From 1877 to 1881, he was Attorney General of the United States in the Cabinet of President Rutherford B. Hayes.  

John Baldwin Raymond (1844 – 1886) was a Delegate from Dakota Territory to the United States House of Representatives (1883-85). Following service in the Civil War Raymond settled in Mississippi. He published the Mississippi Pilot newspaper at Jackson, Mississippi during Reconstruction, He was assistant State treasurer of Mississippi, and was appointed United States marshal of Dakota Territory in 1877, with headquarters at Yankton and later at Fargo. 

1876 United States presidential election held on Tuesday, November 7, 1876, in which Republican nominee Rutherford B. Hayes faced Democrat Samuel J. Tilden. It was one of the most contentious and controversial presidential elections in American history, and gave rise to the Compromise of 1877 by which the Democrats conceded the election to Hayes in return for an end to Reconstruction and the withdrawal of federal troops from the South. After a controversial post-election process, Hayes was declared the winner. The Compromise in effect ceded power in the Southern states to the Democratic Redeemers, who proceeded to disenfranchise black voters thereafter. The 1876 election is the second of five presidential elections in which the person who won the most popular votes did not win the election, but the only such election in which the popular vote winner received a majority (rather than a plurality) of the popular vote. To date, it remains the election that recorded the smallest electoral vote victory (185–184), and the election that yielded the highest voter turnout of the eligible voting age population in American history, at 81.8%. Although it is not disputed that Tilden outpolled Hayes in the popular vote, after a first count of votes, Tilden had won 184 electoral votes to Hayes' 165, with 20 votes from four states unresolved: in Florida, Louisiana, and South Carolina, each party reported its candidate had won the state, while in Oregon, one elector was replaced after being declared illegal for being an "elected or appointed official". The question of who should have been awarded these electoral votes is the source of the continued controversy. An informal deal was struck to resolve the dispute: the Compromise of 1877. Black Republicans felt betrayed as they lost power and were subject to discrimination and harassment to suppress their voting. By 1905, nearly all black men were effectively disenfranchised by state legislatures in every Southern state. In fine condition, with minor age toning and two pin holes at the top edge.

$395   #12243